Museum For Islamic Art Volume 41.2

HAMSA AMULET of silver, gilt, Fez, Morocco, circa 1930. Photograph by Ardon Barhama. Gross Family Collection. Images courtesy of the Museum for Islamic Art, Jerusalem.

Located in the heart of Jerusalem, a city sacred to the three main monotheistic religions, the Museum for Islamic Art is an independent cultural institution dedicated to raising public awareness of Islamic art and culture—a one of a kind in Israel. In addition to its importance as a museum, it serves as a cultural and educational center, as well as a multicultural bridge that connects different sectors of Israeli society—Arabs and Jews, ultraorthodox and secular—while promoting dialogue based on tolerance, mutual respect and equality.

It is a repository for thousands of works of art, including gold and silver artifacts, jewelry and musical instruments, and offers to visitors a rare glimpse of one of the world’s special collections, which tells the story of the Islamic world from the seventh to the nineteenth century. Its exhibition halls are arranged in chronological and geographical order, in accordance with the various dynasties. In addition to the permanent collections of Islamic art, the museum houses the rare permanent collection of clocks which belonged to Sir David Salomons. It is one of the three most important collections in the world, with dozens of clocks of different types, sizes and colors.

The current exhibition, “Jewelry Making: Past & Present,” creates a fascinating dialogue based on the universal language of jewelrymaking, between Islam, Judaism and Christianity, between cultures and ethnic identities, tradition and renewal, and between past and present. Curated by renowned art historian, Dr. Iris Fishof, the exhibition exemplifies the museum’s vision to promote dialogue between the different identities within the Israeli society.

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EXHIBITION INSTALLATION  for “Jewelry Making: Past & Present” at the Museum for Islamic Art.

EXHIBITION INSTALLATION for “Jewelry Making: Past & Present” at the Museum for Islamic Art.

The exhibition is comprised of original jewelry created by forty-five Israeli artists, inspired by rare Islamic jewelry pieces from the museum’s collection. Displayed side-by-side, the contemporary interpretations of the pieces featured in the exhibition are personal and intimate creations that express emotions, ideas and sometimes, even defiance. Their work expands the boundaries of jewelrymaking and offers a new artistic genre which is gradually revealed to the visitor. The variety of Islamic jewelry artifacts are rich and expansive in artistic, technical and cultural terms, and cover a very wide historical period, dating back to the seventh century. These artifacts provided the Israeli artists and jewelers with an inspirational platform, carrying thoughts about the old world and the new world, about the past and future, identity, tradition, and change. Despite the great variety, the content of their works takes a sincere and courageous approach to time and place, and do not shy away from addressing social and political issues.

INSIGNIA: 50 SHADES OF PATRIARCHY LAPEL PINS by Rami Tareef, of silver, brass, gold; lost-wax casting, soldering, sawing, bending, gilding, 10.0 x 5.0 x 1.0 centimeters, 2019.

For example, Rami Tareef exhibits Insignia: 50 Shades of Patriarchalism, a pin-based work which comprises fifty men’s lapel pins with an olive pip made of silver, representing the hierarchy of the Arabic man’s patriarchy. The work is designed to shed light on the changing, or “softening” patriarchal approach of the new Arab man, and to generate dialogue about his role in the family unit, and in society in general.

Paying homage to a nineteenth-century Moroccan Berber fertility jewel, decorated with silver and enamel symbols to ward off the evil eye, Rill Greenfeld created a pendant inspired by the amulet. Her piece, Fertility Now, a plastic box with contraceptive pills inside and around the pendant, utilized the birth control pills in its design and purpose.

BEAD WITH COIN PENDANTS of silver, cloisonné enamel, coins, filigree, 12.0 x 7.0 x 5.5 centimeters, Western Anti-Atlas, Morocco, nineteenth century. FERTILITY NOW PENDANT by Rill Greenfeld, of sterling silver, photopolymer plastic, pill blister; 3D printing, casting, soldering, 8.2 x 8.4 x 4.5 centimeters, 2019. Images courtesy of the Museum for Islamic Art, Jerusalem. Photographs by Shay Ben Efraim, except where noted.

What’s the ‘Matter’? is a contemporary and personal piece made of tin strips taken from a preservatives tin can, electrical wiring, computer parts, and everyday industrial materials. Jewelry artist Merav Rahat took inspiration from a nineteenth-century silver Moroccan necklace with coral, amber and glass beads, enamel, and other materials. Rahat touches on the physical and emotional baggage in the materials she uses, looking at questions of identity, place and memory in the globalization era.

NECKLACE of silver, coral, amber, glass beads, cloisonné enamel, 62.0 centimeters length, Dra’a Valley, Morocco, late nineteenth century. WHAT’S THE ‘MATTER’ NECKPIECE by Merav Rahat, of tin-can sheet metal, electric wire, tricot fabric, nuts and bolts, discs, computer elements, jewelry parts, plastic elements, old bottle caps, branches; coiling, tying, threading, 30.0 x 20.0 x 9.0 centimeters, 2019.

The contemporary interpretations were made especially for the exhibition and act as an extension of the boundaries of jewelrymaking as a contemporary artistic field, both in a conceptual, technical and material standpoint. Despite the great diversity, the pieces relate to the time and place in which we live, sincere and daring, and were made in response to social and political issues.

Also included is a collection of ecclesiastical metalwork from the Franciscan Order that has never been exhibited to the public. These sacred objects date from the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries and have been accumulated throughout the centuries from European nobles who regularly sent money and goods to assist the Franciscans charged with looking after the sanctuaries in Jerusalem. A selection of Jewish vessels and amulets originating from the Levant are showcased from the private collection of William Gross. These pieces reflect the style and culture of their respective eras and regions, as well as the mutual language of folk art that served both Jews and Muslims. In addition, an exhibition spotlight is focused on the works of Yemenite goldsmithing, a local profession for hundreds of years and on the jewelry of the late singer, Ofra Haza.

EXHIBITION INSTALLATION  focusing on artifacts from the three monotheistic religions.

EXHIBITION INSTALLATION focusing on artifacts from the three monotheistic religions.

“Jewelry Making: Past & Present” offers a prideful place to a unique display of jewelry works from the three monotheistic religions for which Jerusalem is sacred. The variety of these works, which were designed for ceremonies or rituals, offers a broad view of the artistic language, materials and techniques used by jewelers from these religions.

“Jewelry Making: Past & Present” shows May 30, 2019 - November 16, 2019 at the Museum for Islamic Art,
2 Hapalmach St., Jerusalem, Israel 9254202. Visit their website at
www.islamicart.co.il/english.

 

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Nadim Sheiban, Director of the Museum for Islamic Art, is the first Arab museum director in Israel. He began his studies at the Hebrew University in 1972. He was a social worker and jurist, and for many years worked in social and community work and served in senior positions at the Welfare Department of the Jerusalem Municipality. In the last decade, Sheiban served as Director of the Jerusalem Foundation Projects Department, where he initiated and managed various projects in the fields of community and education. For five years, he also directed the Culture Department, which initiated projects in the fields of art and culture in the city.