James Thurman & Umut Demirgüç Thurman Volume 39.1

 

The ideals of marriage neatly conveyed by a triad of Cs—complementarity, collaboration and coexistence—are as relevant to the combination of two different art media as they are to the literal union of spouses. In both cases advantages come with the ability of each element of the relationship to enhance the inherent qualities of the other, the potential to combine these qualities in pursuit of mutual objectives, and, perhaps most important of all for the perpetuation of the relationship, the freedom to retain individual identities even while contributing to one that is jointly held. For James Thurman and Umut Demirgüç Thurman, the husband-and-wife team behind Denton, Texas-based UJ Design Studios, the exactitude of the parallel between an effective marriage of art media and success in matrimony is obviously more than just a matter of speculation.

 

LAYERED SYNERGY 12-0929 BROOCH by James Thurman of lathe-turned Thurmanite® and Damascus steel, 5.08 x 5.08 x 1.27 centimeters, 2012.
Photograph by James Thurman.
FRAMED PENÇ NECKLACE by UJ Design Studios of lathe-turned Thurmanite®, enamel, sterling silver, and copper, 5.08 x 3.81 x 0.64 centimeters, 2014. Photograph by Rafael Molina.
MAVI (BLUE) BROOCH by Umut Demirgüç Thurman of sterling silver and enamel, 4.0 x 5.0 centimeters, 2008. Photograph by Ufuk Demirgüç.

 

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“There’s never a break in the conversation,” comments Kansas State University Professor of Art History Glen R. Brown on the advantages of interviewing two artists at once.  “If one doesn’t recall the answer to a question, the other one will.” When Brown visited James Thurman and Umut Demirgüç Thurman, the husband-and-wife team behind UJ Design Studios in Denton, Texas, he was impressed by the degree to which the two artists seemed to understand each other’s personalities as well as their respective work in the studio. “It’s clearly a successful collaboration on two fronts,” he remarks. Brown will be reviewing “Glitterati, Portraits & Jewelry From Colonial Latin America,” at the Denver Art Museum, in the next issue.